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Ed-Webinar Focused On English Language Learners

WestEd is a nonprofit research, development, and service agency and they're organizing a Webinar focused in English language learners. Agenda is scheduled to beging on October 8th and it's being shout out through SchoolMovingUP, which is a WestEd inicitive: The following are the webinar you will have the oportunity to attend: 1. English Learner Literacy Development through Formative Assessment of Oral Language by Alison Bailey and Margaret Heritage. 2. English Learners and the Language Arts by Pamela Spycher. 3. Doing What Works: Teaching Elementary-School English Learners by Nikola Filby. 4. What the Research Does—and Does Not—Say About Teaching English Language Learners by Claude Goldenberg. 5. Building Oral Language into Content Area Instruction (Research from CREATE) by Diane August. 6. Web Tour Taking Center Stage--Act II : Ensuring Success for Middle Grades English Learners by Carol Abbott and Jeanette Ganahl. 7. English Learners in Secondary Mathematics: Rigor and Excellence by Leslie Hamburger. 8. Making Standards-based Lessons Understandable for English Learners: The SIOP Model (Encore Presentation) by Jana Echevarria. 9. Quality Teaching for English Learners: High Challenge and High Support by AĆ­da Walqui. Enough time to plan ahead. Want to participate? Here is how to get involved in these webinars.

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