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Copyblogger 238 Commented Post. Misused Lingo


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We have not to explain the evident difference between a misused and a misspelled word. Bloggers more recognized as "monkey typewriters" do not work under the supervision of an expert as other media outlets do it, a quick look around the web reveals plenty of people is misusing words. Don't fret. Regular ones do, too, included journalists.

Some of these words are common mistakes that can cost you when trying to keep a reader’s attention. Here's the Brian Clark suggestion of the 27 most misused words:

Adverse / Averse


Adverse means unfavorable. Averse means reluctant.

Afterwards


Afterwards is wrong in American English. It’s afterward.

Complement / Compliment


Complement is something that adds to or supplements something else. Compliment is something nice someone says about you.

Criteria


Criteria is plural, and the singular form is criterion. If someone tells you they have only one criteria, you can quickly interject and offer that it be they get a clue.

Farther / Further


Farther is talking about a physical distance. Further is talking about an extension of time or degree.

Fewer / Less


If you can count it, use fewer. If you can’t, use less.

Historic / Historical


Historic means an important event. Historical means something that happened in the past.

Hopefully


This word is used incorrectly so much it may be too late. But let’s make you smarter anyway. The old school rule is you use hopefully only if you’re describing the way someone spoke, appeared, or acted.
    Smart: I hope she says yes.
    Wrong: Hopefully, she says yes.
    Wrong: Hopefully, the weather will be good.
    Smart: It is hoped that the weather cooperates.
    Smart: She eyed the engagement ring hopefully.

Imply / Infer


Imply means you’re sending a subtle message. To infer means you’re interpreting a message.

Insure / Ensure


Insure is correct only when you call up Geico or State Farm for coverage. Ensure means to guarantee, and that’s most often what you’re trying to say, right?

Irregardless


Irregardless is not a word. Use regardless or irrespective.

Literally


"I’m literally starving to death."

No, odds are, you’re not.

Literally means exactly what you say is accurate, no metaphors or analogies. Everything else is figurative (relative, a figure of speech).

Premier / Premiere



Premier is the first and best in status or importance, or a prime minister. Premiere is the opening night of Star Wars 8: George Wants More Money.

Principal / Principle


Principal when used as a noun means the top dog; as an adjective, it means the most important of any set. Principle is a noun meaning a fundamental truth, a law, a rule that always applies, or a code of conduct.

Towards


Towards is wrong in American English. It’s toward. I went 41 years not being sure about this one.

Unique


Unique means (literally) one of a kind. Saying something is very or truly unique is wacked. It’s either a purple cow or it isn’t.

Who / Whom


This one is a lost cause(even for ourlselves, sorry), but let’s go down swinging. The way to deal with the who versus whom quandary is a simple substitution method.

First, a refresher on subjects and objects.

Subjects do the action:

“He/she/we like(s) to rock the house.”

Objects receive the action:

“The rock star sneered at him/her/us.”

Use who for subjects and whom for objects.
    Subjects:
    Who wrote this blog post?
    Who is speaking at the conference?
    Who is going to clean up this mess?
    Objects:
    Whom are you going to write about?
    Whom did he blame for the Google Slap?
    Whom did he bait for the links?

Truth is, whom just doesn’t sound right in many situations where it’s correct, especially in the US. You now know the rule… feel free to break it.

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