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Gabbing in a Foreign Slang

I think four expressions should be learned when you are in a country which is not yours. "Hello" "Thank You" "How Are You?" and "Please". To call one's beloved a cabbage is not always a good pick up line in America, but it seems choux is a term of rich endearment among french people. The Spanish see nothing odd when calling respectfully a "carrot guy". "Un tipo zanahoria". O when someone is very cute: "He's a tremendous cupcake" which translated means, "Es un tremendo bizcocho". Feeling tired in French you say "I've been hit by a pump". Winking, when you say you had a very good romantic time, you say, "We took our foot" But Spanish if they didn't take their feet so well and the woman dumps the man, it is said, "lo mandó a freir esparragos", meaning "she sent him to fry asparagus". Admiring a woman form the French will say that "The balcony is crowded". In Mexico when they don't like someone could be heard "He falls to the mother in me" and for Colombians a chain smoker is identified as "smokes like a whore in jail" while in Spain they would say, "smokes like a cart driver" French slang for having that one drink too many J'ai un verre dans le nez translates "I have one drink in mu nose". Meantime, in Spanish a characterization for a woman without a full balcony is literally translated: She"swims the backstroke and the breaststroke". Blind to balconies and backstrokes, the romantic allowed a little gallic smooching tries his luck with what might be called a Freedom Kiss(in the fashion fo freedom fries), explained as: "I rolled a skate to her"

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