Have you ever heard of Ghotit? This is a super-spell-checker, ideal for very beginning English Language Learners and ELL’s with learning disabilities (as well as native speakers with challenges).

It has the ability to help sleuth-out words that people are trying to spell — in a much more in depth way than most regular spell-checkers.

Worth to give it a try.

h/t: SpeEdChange

This video highlights some of the differences in vocabulary between British and American English. The narrator is British but has spent time in the USA.

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If you liked this first installment, then you might want to check the Series.

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Blogs are popular but good ranking blogs and well read blogs, for that matter, are only few. Nobody can say that quality counts when blogging about any particular subject or niche. However, even when visitors send your posts to StumbleUpon or promote them in Twitter, one thing is capital when we talk about content. Franklin Bishop gives you the 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Blog but for us all comes to a single one, the most important of all.

Do not even start a blog if you are a really bad writer. Period.

"You’re full of wonderful blog post ideas, but you know you are a terrible writer. Unfortunately, no matter how practical and valuable your ideas, if you cannot write coherently, you shouldn’t blog. Paying someone who can write to blog for you is an expensive exercise. More importantly, the essence of you simply cannot be portrayed in the same manner. Bite the bullet and learn! Learning to write well will benefit many areas of your business, not just your blog."

Guide to Commonly Misused Words
Inconceivable parrot words.
Photo by ikes
We have not to explain the evident difference between a misused and a misspelled word. Bloggers more recognized as "monkey typewriters" do not work under a supervision of an expert as other media outlets do it, a quick look around the web reveals plenty of people is misusing words. Don't fret. Regular ones do, too, included journalists.

Some of these words are common mistakes that can cost you when trying to keep a reader’s attention. Here's the Brian Clark suggestion of the 27 most misused words:

Adverse / Averse


Adverse means unfavorable. Averse means reluctant.

Afterwards


Afterwards is wrong in American English. It’s afterward.

Complement / Compliment


Complement is something that adds to or supplements something else. Compliment is something nice someone says about you.

Criteria


Criteria is plural, and the singular form is criterion. If someone tells you they have only one criteria, you can quickly interject and offer that it be they get a clue.

Farther / Further


Farther is talking about a physical distance. Further is talking about an extension of time or degree.

Fewer / Less


If you can count it, use fewer. If you can’t, use less.

Historic / Historical


Historic means an important event. Historical means something that happened in the past.

Hopefully


This word is used incorrectly so much it may be too late. But let’s make you smarter anyway. The old school rule is you use hopefully only if you’re describing the way someone spoke, appeared, or acted.
    Smart: I hope she says yes.
    Wrong: Hopefully, she says yes.
    Wrong: Hopefully, the weather will be good.
    Smart: It is hoped that the weather cooperates.
    Smart: She eyed the engagement ring hopefully.

Imply / Infer


Imply means you’re sending a subtle message. To infer means you’re interpreting a message.

Insure / Ensure


Insure is correct only when you call up Geico or State Farm for coverage. Ensure means to guarantee, and that’s most often what you’re trying to say, right?

Irregardless


Irregardless is not a word. Use regardless or irrespective.

Literally


"I’m literally starving to death."

No, odds are, you’re not.

Literally means exactly what you say is accurate, no metaphors or analogies. Everything else is figurative (relative, a figure of speech).

Premier / Premiere



Premier is the first and best in status or importance, or a prime minister. Premiere is the opening night of Star Wars 8: George Wants More Money.

Principal / Principle


Principal when used as a noun means the top dog; as an adjective, it means the most important of any set. Principle is a noun meaning a fundamental truth, a law, a rule that always applies, or a code of conduct.

Towards


Towards is wrong in American English. It’s toward. I went 41 years not being sure about this one.

Unique


Unique means (literally) one of a kind. Saying something is very or truly unique is wacked. It’s either a purple cow or it isn’t.

Who / Whom


This one is a lost cause(even for ourlselves, sorry), but let’s go down swinging. The way to deal with the who versus whom quandary is a simple substitution method.

First, a refresher on subjects and objects.

Subjects do the action:

“He/she/we like(s) to rock the house.”

Objects receive the action:

“The rock star sneered at him/her/us.”

Use who for subjects and whom for objects.
    Subjects:
    Who wrote this blog post?
    Who is speaking at the conference?
    Who is going to clean up this mess?
    Objects:
    Whom are you going to write about?
    Whom did he blame for the Google Slap?
    Whom did he bait for the links?

Truth is, whom just doesn’t sound right in many situations where it’s correct, especially in the US. You now know the rule… feel free to break it.

"The key to writing fast is knowing and perfecting a few."

Alisa Brownan from projecthappilyeverafter says to be a newspaper reporter, write guest blogs and magazine articles, and she ghost and co-author books. She also claims to spend only 6-7 hours typing daily to write between 5,000 and 10,000 words a week!

Article first appeared on problogger.net and if you like what Brownan advices, then follow her @alisabow:

Here the 6 step system, experienced Alisa Brownan uses to write her articles quite fast:

Step 1: Know what you want to say before you sit down. As soon as you finish any blog, start thinking about your next one. Go over lines in your head.

Step 2: Pick the basic format you will use to organize your blog. Most blogs fall into one of the following organizational templates:

  • Q & A – Someone poses a question and then you answer it.

  • Tips: You start with a couple paragraphs of explanation followed by a list of tips.

  • Story: Once upon a time something happened to me, I learned someone from it, and now we’re at the end.

  • List: This might be a list of great websites, great books, or great people to follow on Twitter. This is where we fail way, way too much.

  • Quiz or Test: You pose a series of questions or offer a check off list that allows the reader to figure something out

Step 3: Start writing and don’t stop until there are no words left in your head. Don’t stop for typos. Don’t stop for grammar. Don’t stop because you lose your train of thought. Insert quick notes as you write, such as CHECK NAME SPELLING, FIND URL, or WHAT IS THE WORD I WANT HERE? I use that last one quite frequently.

Step 4: Read your blog from beginning to end. Fill in holes. Tinker. Replace your all caps notes with real text.

Step 5: Read out loud once or twice. This will help you catch typos, pinpoint really awkward writing, and help you tighten things up.

Step 6: Post it!

Via Problogger

An interesting list of 51 mispronounced words it's been posted by DailyWritingTips. A the moment we write this post, comments number by 297, from people who have contributed to the list or have made appreciations on the topic. There is a word of caution, though: "I’m writing from an American perspective" says DailyWritingTips.

At least one of these is, in our view, a lost cause: #21 the two pronunciations of forte. We’ve never heard any English-speaker use it to mean 'strong point' and pronounce it according to French rules — everyone we’ve ever heard pronounces it the Italian way. If you want to get really picky, the masculine form of the French adjective is 'fort' — if it should be pronounced in English according to French rules, then how come English has adopted its feminine form 'forte'? Reasons are lost in the mists of time — let’s just get on with it!

1. aegis - The ae in this word is pronounced /ee/. Say EE-JIS/, not /ay-jis/. In mythology the “aegis” is associated especially with the goddess Athene. It is her shield with the Gorgon’s head on it.

2. anyway - The problem with this word is not so much pronunciation as the addition of an unnecessary sound. Don’t add an s to make it “anyways.” The word is ANYWAY.

3. archipelago - Because the word is from Greek, the ch is pronounced with a /k/ sound. Say /AR-KI-PEL-A-GO/, not /arch-i-pel-a-go/.

4. arctic - Note the C after the R. Say /ARK-TIK/, not /ar-tik/.

5. accessory - the first C has a “hard” sound. Say /AK-SESS-OR-Y/, not /ass-ess-or-y/.

6. ask - The S comes before the K. Say /ASK/ not /aks/.

7. asterisk - Notice the second S. Say /AS-TER-ISK/, not /as-ter-ik/.

8. athlete - The word has two syllables, not three. Say /ATH-LETE/, not /ath-uh-lete/.

9. barbed wire- Notice the AR in the first syllable. Say /BARBD/, not /bob/.

10. cache - The word is of French origin, but it does not end with an accented syllable. A cache is a hiding place or something that is being hidden: a cache of supplies; a cache of money; a cache of drugs. Say /KASH/, not /ka-shay/.

We don't want to steal the whole post from DWT, so for the next 31 words you would have to head over the original post. Any contributions this far?

Surely you've read a few or at least, one book about how to become rich because it's the human nature to look for pleasure and commodities. I have spent some time with professional coaches that helped me out on personal developing and showed some necessary steps, everyone dreaming of being rich, before they can accomplish and become such a dream.

Now, many of course will be thinking that this is not a dream since many ( very few thought) had worked hard and earned enough money to accumulate millions and millions. Some others will start arguing that this post doesn't even deserve the attention because it is not written by a rich man. We will accept your discrepancies with humility but let tell you what is saying one of the top 100 blogger by Technorati and top influencers on the web according to the Wall Street Journal, Neil Patel.

There is not such an incredible revelation but he goes right to the point of what is expected for a regular person, in order to perform in the direction the money flows. After reading his post here, please don't go: Damn it! I have none of these. Now I will never become a millionaire.

QuickSprout asserts that you can become rich only if you meet these four criteria: Inheritance, Stunning physical attributes, Knowledge, Creativity and Willingness.

The co-founder of these three Internet companies: ACS, Crazy Egg, and KISSmetrics, closed his post being quite strict on his postulates, "Hopefully you fall into one of these categories or else the chances of you becoming a millionaire are probably worse than the lottery... If you aren’t you better learn to, or don’t waste your time trying to become rich."